Skip to Main Content

The Iowa Clinic Addresses Gaps in Adult Vaccination Rates

Every year, an estimated 1 million older adults contract pneumococcal pneumonia and 5 to 7 percent will die, according to data from the AMGA Foundation, the research arm of the American Medical Group Association (AMGA). A team from The Iowa Clinic is nationally recognized for their work to address gaps.


Image of The Iowa Clinic West Des Moines location

The Iowa Clinic was recently honored with the 2017 Analytics 50 award for their innovation to address gaps in its adult vaccinations. "We are proud of this achievement and the team that led our effort. The recognition is just one measure of the exceptional quality that our care teams and physicians work hard to provide to patients every day," said The Iowa Clinic CEO, C. Edward Brown.

The Drexel LeBow Analytics 50, given out by the LeBow College of Business, is a national recognition of industry innovators – an annual initiative honoring 50 companies across the country who are using analytics to solve business challenges. The Analytics 50 provides a platform to share best practices in a variety of industries and an opportunity for organizations to receive recognition for their achievements. Dr. Christina Taylor - Chief Quality Officer, Melissa Linder - Director of Quality and Care Management and Dr. Barbara Hodne – Family Medicine, along with their team, were recognized in the healthcare category and were among some well-known national companies including Starbucks, Southwest Airlines, Caterpillar, Adobe, and Accuweather.

“We recognized the adult immunization gap and initiated an analytics-driven collaborative project to increase immunization rates in adult patients, with a specific focus on pneumococcal pneumonia and influenza immunizations,” said Dr. Christina Taylor. As a result of this project, The Iowa Clinic increased the pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine rate in the 65 and older group to 77 percent, a 21 percent increase.

Every year, an estimated 1 million older adults contract pneumococcal pneumonia and 5 to 7 percent will die, according to data from the AMGA Foundation, the research arm of the American Medical Group Association (AMGA). Furthermore, pneumococcal disease accounts for $3.5 billion in direct medical costs, with patients 65 and older accounting for the majority of those costs. In addition, those 65 and older tend to be the most severe cases causing nearly 2 million hospital days each year.

Back to top